Lower Your Cancer Risk By Doing These Three Things

According to cancer.org, almost 1,600 people a day die from cancer, and this year alone, about 1.6 million new cancer cases will be diagnosed. With statistics like these, it’s important to do everything you can to ensure your good health. You can lower your cancer risk easily by doing three simple things.

1. Clean Up Your Diet

Time and time again you’ll hear experts emphasize the importance of diet in relation to good health. Why? Because you literally are what you eat. Your diet provides nutrition along with the basic building blocks required for every conceivable function in your body. Consuming junk foods, processed foods and an overabundance of sugar provide empty calories and empty nutrition. Fortify and nourish your body with fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and fish.

And food is more than just fuel; it can be healing and therapeutic. As Hippocrates, the father of medicine said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Certain foods can actually reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. For example, tomatoes and watermelon can help ward off prostate cancer, while dairy foods and fatty fish can help lower breast cancer risk.

When it comes to cleaning up your diet, no one expects you to be perfect. Start by slowing substituting healthier choices at first, like eating baked potato chips instead greasy trans fat-laden ones. Gradually add healthier foods as you go along. Remember every little bit helps you reduce your cancer risk.

2. Exercise

Getting your regular dose of exercise also goes a long way towards reducing your cancer risk. Strive for at least a moderate 30-minute workout several times a week, although you may want to up the intensity of your workouts based on a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. After a long-term study of Eastern Finland males, it was concluded that the more physically active men were less likely to develop cancer. In addition, those with more intense workouts (30 minutes per day) had a 50 percent reduction in cancer risk.

So whether you go for high-intensity aerobics or just a walk around the park—do something to get your body moving. It all adds up. Even small bursts of activity like taking the stairs or parking your car further away from the office can help.

3. Follow Preventative Measures

That old quote “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” certainly means a lot when it comes to cancer. Obviously diet and exercise count as preventative, but there are other measures you can take.

For starters be sun smart. Wear sunglasses, sunscreen, and protective clothing when out in the sun, but also be sure to engage in some healthy unprotected sun exposure too. It’s the best way for your body to get Vitamin D—a great cancer fighter.

Also be smart about your exposure to cancer-causing agents like pesticides, chemicals, radiation, etc.

While no one is immune from cancer, lowering your risk is easy when you watch your diet, exercise and seek prevention.

Photo: Pexels

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